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Homestead Exemption for The Elderly or Disabled

Q: What is the Homestead Exemption Program?
A. The N.C. General Assembly passed the Homestead Exemption Law which provides property tax relief for North Carolinians who are age 65 and over or totally and permanently disabled. The exemption excludes up to one-half of your home's assessed value, or $25,000 (whichever is greater) from property taxes.

Example:

 

Without Homestead :

 

With Homestead :

Value of Home

150,000

 

Value of Home

150,000

 

 

 

Less Exemption Adj. Value of Home

150,000 - 75,000 = =75,000

Multiplied by Sample Tax Rate

x .0048

 

Multiplied by Sample Tax Rate

x. 0048

Base Property Tax

= $720.00

 

Base Property Tax

$360.00

Solid Waste Fee

+ $114.00

 

Solid Waste Fee

+ $114.00

Total Taxes 

= $834.00

 

Total Taxes

= $474.00

Please note: This example is a comparative guide and is provided as a general information tool only. The tax rate used in the example is county-wide general fund rate in effect for the tax year 2017.

Q: How do I qualify for the Homestead Exemption?
A. You may be qualified for the Homestead Exemption if:

  • You are at least 65 years of age on January 1st of the tax year in which you wish to claim the exemption; AND

  • You and your spouse's income did not exceed $29,500 for the year prior to which an application is made. You must own your permanent residence, including a manufactured home, and be a legal resident of Currituck County;

    OR

  • You are certified totally and permanently disabled by a licensed physician or governmental agency; AND

  • You and your spouse's income did not exceed $29,500 for the year prior to which an application is made. You must own your permanent residence, including a manufactured home, and be a legal resident of Currituck County.

JOINT OWNERS (other than husband and wife) who meet all other requirements may be eligible for a partial exemption not to exceed their percentage of ownership in the residence.

Q: Do I have to apply in person?
A. For this exemption, the qualifying homeowner may submit an application by mail, fax, or in person at the Tax Department. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view this document.

Q: What supporting documents do I need in order to apply?
A. If you are applying because of disability you must furnish a certification that you are totally and permanently disabled from either a licensed physician or from a government agency. The agency must have the proper authority to determine qualifications for disability benefits. A certification from the Social Security Administration is not acceptable due to the fact that the SSA certifies someone as being disabled if their disability is expected to last one year or more, but not necessarily permanent.  (Physician Certification of Disability). If you are over 65 years old you do not need to submit a certification of disability.

You must also provide proof of your income. If you are required to file a Federal Income Tax return you must provide a copy of the first page of the return. Proof of income must reflect income for the year immediately preceding the tax year for which an application is made. (For example, if an application is submitted for 2017, then income for 2016 must be reported.)

Q: How much income can I make and still qualify for the exemption?
A. For the year 2017, the income limit is $29,500. This threshold is adjusted annually for cost-of-living. Income is defined as your adjusted gross income plus all other moneys received from every source other than gifts or inheritances from family members. Income does include money received from social security, disability, retirement and rental income.

Q: When is the deadline to file an application?
A. Applications must be received by June 1st of the year for which the exemption is applied.

Q: Do I need to reapply annually?
A. You do not need to reapply annually unless there is a change which affects the deed to your property. You do need to advise the Tax Department if:

  • You sell or rent your house, OR
  • You make changes to the owners listed on the deed, OR
  • There is a change in your disability status, OR
  • Your income increases to greater than is allowed to qualify