Flood Preparedness

Flood Hazard

Although the Atlantic Ocean and the Currituck Sound draw people to build in Currituck County, they also subject the property to flood hazards.

High tides and storm surge can cause dune overwash and inundate lower elevations. Hurricanes and northeasters have caused damage in Currituck County in the past and will again in the future.

The most notable storm was the “Ash Wednesday Storm”.

Flood Insurance

The need for flood insurance in any community is determined by the location of the property. Although insurance is not required in all cases, it is suggested.

The National Flood Insurance Act, as amended in 1973, requires that flood insurance be purchased “by property owners who are being assisted by Federal programs or by Federally supervised, regulated or insured agencies or institutions in the acquisition or improvement of land or facilities located or to be located in identified areas as having special flood hazards.”

Homeowner Insurance policies exclude flood damage.

Flood Insurance, which reimburses you for your flood damage to your property, is purchased each year by Currituck County citizens who reside in areas considered flood zones.  Federal Emergency Management Agency has rated Currituck County’s flood insurance as an eight.

Flood Hazard

Although the Atlantic Ocean and the Currituck Sound draw people to build in Currituck County, they also subject the property to flood hazards.

High tides and storm surge can cause dune overwash and inundate lower elevations. Hurricanes and northeasters have caused damage in Currituck County in the past and will again in the future.

The most notable storm was the “Ash Wednesday Storm”.

Flood Warning System

Floods are a fact of life in North Carolina. Flooding in Currituck County is normally associated with hurricanes and northeasters. Residents should be concerned about floods whether they live on the Outer Banks or the mainland!

The following radio and television stations broadcast situation reports, media advisories, and citizen information from the Currituck County Emergency Operations Center (EOC):

Radio Stations
WOBR-AM 95
WRSF-FM 106
WCMS-FM 100.5
WFOG-FM 92.5
WKJX-FM 96
WGAI-AM 56
WCXL-FM 104.1
Television Stations
WAVY- TV (10)
WYAH-TV (27)
WVEC-TV (13)
WTKR-TV (3)
WITN-TV (7)
WSKY-TV (4)

NOAA Weather Service Radio Frequency IN Cape Hatteras is 162.475 MHz, IN driver, Virginia, IT IS 162.550 MHz

Currituck County has an override system that enables Emergency Management to give voice advisories and warnings over normal programming on all cable stations.

Be Prepared

Early flood and hurricane warnings provide time for people in threatened areas to lessen their damages and evacuate if necessary. Before a storm threatens, take steps to protect your property and your life.

  • The first step is to find out the probability of flooding in your area. The Division of Planning and Zoning has copies of Flood Insurance Rate Maps that identify properties subject to 100 year storm frequency.
  • Make a complete inventory of your property. Take pictures and describe inventory. Store these and other documents in a waterproof container or safe deposit box. This will help you in obtaining an insurance settlement.
  • Check your insurance policy and make sure it is up to date and you have a policy that fits your needs.
  • Know the warning signals and what to do in the event a warning is given. Listen to the local radio and television stations listed in this brochure for weather advisories and emergency instructions.
  • Keep a list of emergency phone numbers in a prominent location next to the telephone.
  • Learn first aid.
  • Learn the evacuation route.
  • Learn your child’s school or day care center emergency plans.
When A Warning Is Issued
  • Keep your car fueled; once evacuation has been ordered stations may be inoperable.
  • Listen to local television and radio for emergency broadcasts and instructions.
  • Follow instructions. If you are advised to evacuate, do so immediately.

If time permits, the following should be done:

  • Board up or tape windows and doors to prevent flying glass.
  • Stock your car with nonperishable foods, drinking water, blankets, flashlights, first aid kit, dry clothes, and any medication that may be needed for your family.
  • Fill sinks, bathtubs and jugs with water in case the water supply becomes contaminated.
  • Bring outdoor furniture inside or tie them securely.
  • Move valuables to upper floors or higher elevations.
  • If advised to evacuate, turn off main power and close main gas valve.
If You Are Unable To Leave

If you are caught in the house by sudden rising waters, move to the second floor. If it becomes necessary, move to the roof. Take a flashlight, a portable radio, and warm clothing with you and wait for help. Emergency rescue workers will be looking for you.

Property Protection Measures

Simple actions that can be taken to protect property include moving equipment and furniture to higher levels and more involved efforts such as earthen dams and sandbagging. More permanent approaches should be taken where possible.

The Federal Insurance Administration has published a manual that describes techniques for flood-proofing existing structures. The Design Manual for Retrofitting Floodprone Residential Structures explains various measures that can be taken in an existing structure to reduce the potential of flooding. This manual is available free of charge online or writing to:

Federal Emergency Management Agency
ATTN: Publications
P.O. Box 70274
Washington, D.C. 20024